You are hereCrappie Forums / General Crappie Talk / Tips & Tricks! / Trolling for crappie

Trolling for crappie


Biggame's picture

By Biggame - Posted on 26 March 2009

How do you troll for crappiei? I have noticed on quite a few forums people trolling for crappie. I have a few questions. Which motor do you use the outboard or the trolling motor? I have tried it with jigs and my bait seems to stay shallow. The only way I can get my bait down to the strike zone is to stop and let the bait sink which takes quite a few minutes. Thanks for any help you can give me.

tnjeff's picture

It also depends on what type of trolling you are talking about,if you are wanting to spider rig or slow troll, the capps and coleman rig is the way to go,you place your rods out the front of the boat,most of the time the rods are 10 ft or longer,and troll them very slow over so kind of cover like brushpiles or stumps or ledges,very slow like .3 or .4 on a GPS.Then there is whats call Longline trolling,thats where you place your rods out the back of the boat,this way you just cast your lines out the back of the boat as far as you can and take of trolling at about 1.0 to 1.4 on a GPS.Most of the time you will be useing 1/8 jigs.You either how to reel in or make very wide turns to keep the line from running togather.You can cover alot more water and at a faster pace this way.There is also sideways trolling,lot of folks troll this way on pickwick lake,you just mount your trolling motor to the side of your boat,close to the middle and push the boat sideways though the water,placeing you rods on the side of the boat,put out just enought line to keep you bait about two foot off the bottom.It help to have a small or light boat for this type of trolling.All these type of trolling is done with a trolling motor,about the only time you use the gas motor to troll with is pulling crankbaits,even then I still use my trolling motor.

Smiley
LET'S GO FISHING SOMETIME!

Ray's picture
Capps and Coleman rig
Capps and Coleman rig

I think this will help you keep your bait down. This is how the Capps and Coleman rig looks and works. You will still need to control boat speed with maybe a drift sock or chain but this rig will fix you up.

Ray

bigcountry08's picture

Biggame, People use different things. I use the trolling motor. It sounds to me that you might be moving a little too fast. The key to trolling is slow. There are many ways to slow the boat down. You can drag a piece of logging chain behind the boat, or buy a drift sock. I've seen on another forum where a guy cut a hole in the bottom of a five gallon bucket and used it like a drift sock.

firecaptain's picture

we just drag a small piece of railroad iron cheap to replace if you loose it

Thanks for stopping by www.crappie101.com. We are the site dedicated to crappie fishingi. We bring you tips and techniques from crappie country's top pros and the everyday fisherman not to mention the most complete information on crappie lakes from all around the country.

Bookmark Us

Bookmark Website 
Bookmark Page 

Follow Us

Find www.crappie101.com on TwitterFind www.crappie101.com on FacebookFind www.crappie101.com on YouTubeFind www.crappie101.com on Flickr

Platinum Sponsor

Current Moon

Recommend this page

Products - Block

Who's online

There are currently 0 users and 58 guests online.

A method of keeping fish alive after they have been caught. A string or small nylon rope is threaded through the mouth and gills of a fish and is then tied off to the boat or dock allowing the fish to remain overboard in the water but preventing them from swimming away. With the advent of livewells and other more modern methods of keeping fish, stringers have become nearly obsolete, but can still be quite handy when fishing from the bank of a pond. The term 'stringer' is also used by anglers to indicate the size of their catch for the day (10-pound stringer = 10 pounds of fish).

Search Glossary

Crappie Tournaments & Events

No Upcoming Events!